Capacity, Christmas, Kids and Crates

Vermont duck hunter Bob Glandon called me yesterday to discuss how he had motorized his W500 and to see if I had any suggestions. Bob is a pretty smart guy so, other than the advantages of using a u-joint extension tiller, I really wasn’t able to offer much in terms of changes.

Not surprisingly, a discussion of boating conditions included the weather which led to how warm this past winter had been in the Northeast. I mentioned I saw people in shorts playing golf on Christmas Day on my way to Syracuse, NY. That reminded Bob that he had a taken a photo of his grandchildren, 4 of them in his W500 all at once, on the lake in Vermont on Christmas Day!

I asked if I could publish it and here it is:

4 Kids in a W500-Glandon
Christmas Day in a W500 in Vermont!

Whenever I see videos and articles about how you can add a crate to an ordinary fishing kayak I always ask myself: “If these ordinary kayaks are supposed to be so big and so roomy, why do they need crates for storage?”. They do because they are not.

If you are looking for a kayak (for hunting, fishing, photography, camping, etc) that has serious capacity, and still weighs only 6o pounds, you may want to consider a Wavewalk. Oh, and as far as stability goes, what other kayak would you put 4 of your grandchildren in?

Thanks for sharing, Bob.

The W500 is fast in more ways than one.

This under-3-minutes video shows how I usually land, exit and transport my Wavewalks. I only car-top if I will be traveling on the interstate where traffic moves at close to 75 mph. I hope it helps viewers understand some of the real-world advantages of this most excellent fishing kayak.

Use Your Noodle(s)

Among the Wavewalk modifications I considered over this extended Northeast winter was an alternative way to install floatation in my W500 kayak. This article explains a new approach that I think many of you may want to implement.

Foam “pool noodles” have proven themselves to be a very good solution in many ways. They are extremely buoyant, virtually rot-proof and highly flexible. And available in a wide variety of colors! Attaching 2 is standard on all W500s and more can be added as an option, either by a dealer, factory direct or by Wavewalk owners themselves.

Installation is typically done in one of two ways, both using bungee cord threaded through the center of the noodle. First is to attach them on the outside of the kayak running along the and just below the gunnel. The other approach is to bungee them to the “ceiling” of the kayak’s underside which is, in fact, the underside of the saddle. This is the method I have used (with 4 noodles) until now.

It is important to remember that the purpose of the floatation is to aid in recovery of a swamped boat and not to increase the load-capacity. As a result, where they are attached is a matter of personal preference, as long as the connections are secure.

As you can see in the pictures, this new approach is remarkably simple. Each noodle is positioned inside the kayak, under the gunnel. The noodles are barely wider than the flared edge of the gunnel so they protrude into the passenger compartment by only about 1/2 inch. 4 noodles (2 per side) will fit easily as the hulls are over 11 feet long and the noodles are each about 5 feet. Fixing them in to the kayak is even easier than the traditional way. For each noodle you simply make 2 holes along the gunnel, each hole just wide enough to accommodate the zip-ties.

The noodles will droop slightly at the unsupported ends which extend into the hulls, but really has no negative effect other than cosmetic. If you want the noodles to stay straight and tight to the top of the hull, just insert a narrow wooden dowel into the noodle prior to installation.

If you want even more floatation you can take 4 additional noodles, cut each into 3 pieces and bundle them together with waterproof twine. Then you extend the dowel so it is halfway in the zip-tied noodle and halfway inside one piece of your noodle bundle. No additional attachment points are needed.

Top view of noodle installation
Top view of noodle installation

 

Side view
Side view
Detail of noodle extended into hull with slight droop
Detail of noodle extended into hull with slight droop. Note that it fits even with flush-mount rod holders (and saddle brackets)
"Bundled" noodle attached, supported by a dowel and hidden in hull
“Bundled” noodle attached, supported by a dowel and hidden in hull. Dark object is connector for Motor Mount.

 

Previous installation of 4 noodles underneath and between the hulls.
Previous installation of 4 noodles underneath and between the hulls.

I believe this approach offers a number of benefits:

  • The noodles are out of the way and almost invisible (a slight exaggeration).
  • They are completely protected from water damage as they are shielded from the rain and in the case of under-saddle installation, from splashing.
  • Any water that may reach them will quickly drip away.
  • They are protected from the wind and rain during transport so there is no stress on the mounting system.
  • Wind resistance while car-topping is reduced because they are inside the kayak.
  • Up to 8 noodles can be installed with almost no impact on internal storage.
  • You now have a comfortable, cushioned handhold whenever you grab the gunnel to lift, load, unload or move the boat.

I was concerned that they might interfere with draining the W500 but, it is not an issue. When the boat is flipped over to empty any water that may have gotten in (rain has been the only time for me) the noodles leave the gunnel channels unobstructed so the water can flow to the 3 drainage holes at each end of the kayak.

Please let me know if you have any questions or suggestions.

No hands method to load and unload a Wavewalk

Late this season Al Arioli purchased a W500. He is working on a plan to add a rowing system for the coming spring such that he will be facing in the direction of travel rather than the traditional method where you are always looking where you’ve been.

In the meantime, Al has devised a method to get his Wavewalk on and off of his Prius (see car-topping story W kayak attached on top of Toyota Prius at the Wavewalk blog) without even touching it!

The system is  effective and low-cost. Just some rope, a few pulleys and some 2 lengths of dowel.

The suspended Wavewalk
The suspended Wavewalk
Detail of pipe slipped between handles
Detail of dowel slipped between handles

 

Close-up of pulley system
Close-up of pulley system

Al just pulls into the garage, slides the dowels under the handles at each end of his W500 and pulls the rope. When its time to head out he just reverses the process.

Simple is best. Thanks Al!

Fastest Kayak Loading

Interest in this part of my previous video was so great I’ve posted it as a separate movie. Again, it is shown in real time. If you have an SUV the procedure is the same except that you raise the front a little higher and you only need one towel.

Kayak Fishing on Queechy Lake with Al Lunn

I get a chance to go fishing with life-long fisherman Al Lunn from New York in his new Wavewalk fishing kayak. The day was very windy even though it doesn’t look like it in the movie because we kept moving to protected areas. Despite the wind, Al stood and cast from his W500 like it was second nature.

View to the end to see Al conquer car-topping a kayak. (Best viewed @720P)